New growth during flower

So I’m not sure what to make of this. It just appears to be new internode growth. I’m just concerned that it might turn out to be a pollen sack. Currently day 47/61 of the flower stage and 160 altogether. As always thank you for your help.

7 Likes

Hey @Driver3599,

That’s a Calyx, it’s the female flower. From it emerge the stigmas (hairs) that turn from clear to white to amber once ready to harvest. You can see the trichomes forming on the outside of it, a clear indication you are a girl. All good, no worries! Read Me for more info.

Cheers,
Stephen

8 Likes

Look at them swell up!!! :smiling_face_with_three_hearts: :white_flower:

6 Likes

Thank you very much for clarifying.

While I’ve got you, if you keep extending late veg how long could you conceivably keep the plant growing? Mine was a bit of a late bloomer, so it’s still very short at 160 days into the grow. My concern however is the degradation of the trichomes. My buds still need a lot of time. I’m assuming I’m going to reach the point of diminishing returns soon in which the buds develop and grow but end up losing THC.

Any thoughts?

As always thank you very much for your help.

2 Likes

It is exciting!

2 Likes

collect them all and have a celebratory harvest joint, great way to celebrate a harvest!

3 Likes

With a plant still in veg at 160 days and developing slow, I would be more concerned with how long is she going to take to bloom and ripen her buds. One big factor that impedes on plant growth is very low CO2, is your grobo at a spot that has adequate airflow?

Can you share a photo of your plants and its current height?

The amount of CO2 in the air has a profound effect on the rate of photosynthesis and plant growth. Photosynthesis speeds up as the amount of CO2 in the air increases, as long as there is enough light to power it (to an upper limit). Photosynthesis slows to a crawl and virtually stops at a CO2 concentration of around 200 ppm. Lacking CO2, plants continue respiration and growth for a short time, until their sugars are used up; then they slow down their metabolism to conserve energy. Only when more CO2 is available can the plant processes continue.

Source:

3 Likes

Hey Vicc,

My setup is good. It took me a long time to get it dialed in. The reason it is such a long grow is that i am experimenting with different grow techniques.

I saw the post from Grobo advertising the CO2 canisters and decided I’d take a look. The problem is spending $50 for a canister that last two weeks. At $100/month that is simply not reasonable. And that doesn’t even consider the $50 in nutes every grow.

Thanks again for the help.

2 Likes

I agree with you that CO2 does not come cheap. It is one of the most expensive additions to a grow operation, including tent grows. If the budget is out of your range, I would suggest trying some DIY solutions to see how that works for you and if its too cumbersome. I tried making my own CO2 gas with baking soda and citrus acid, that costed more than what’s on the grobo store.

I use a CO2 tank and a CO2 controller for my grow tent, the initial cost was around $400 and the CO2 gas refills cost me around $5-10 a month, depending on plant stage. Also not to mention the CO2 sensors and alarm I need for my sealed grow room so that I do not poison myself or my kids with too much CO2 in this room.

1 Like

That sounds like an excellent idea. What CO2 and CO2 controller do you use? Can you honestly say you’ve noticed a difference? I don’t mind the initial outlay. it’s the recurring costs every month. They start to add up quickly. The cost of growing would exceed the cost to purchase. And that is just not acceptable.

Thanks again.

1 Like

Here is a post with my setup, its not cheap. I also had my grobo inside a sealed tent.

2 Likes

@Driver3599,

  • (Congratulations It’s A Girl):

--


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

2 Likes